Trials

  • July 24, 2024

    Ex-Ohio Zoo CEO Pleads Guilty Just Before $2.3M Theft Trial

    The former chief executive officer of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium pled guilty to 15 felonies just two weeks before he was to face an Ohio jury on charges he participated in a scheme to take $2.3 million in public funds from the organization, state Attorney General Dave Yost announced.

  • July 23, 2024

    Cooperator In Cannabis Bank Fraud Case Dodges Prison

    A U.K. national who testified against two businessmen accused of fooling banks into processing federally illicit transactions worth $150 million for California cannabis delivery company Eaze Technologies Inc. on Tuesday was spared from serving any time in prison.

  • July 23, 2024

    Nettled Exec Tells Jury Wells Fargo Doesn't Get His Disability

    A former Wells Fargo managing director who claims he was terminated because of his disability wavered between being tearful and exasperated during four hours on the stand Tuesday as he tried to explain to a jury in Charlotte what workplace accommodations he was seeking and why.

  • July 23, 2024

    FTC Won't Delay Challenge To Handbag Merger Either

    The Federal Trade Commission has declined to pause its administrative challenge to the $8.5 billion handbag merger between the owners of Coach and Michael Koors, saying that even a district court refusal to temporarily enjoin the merger might not end the FTC's in-house case.

  • July 23, 2024

    Samsung Loses Bid To Throw Out $303M Patent Verdict

    A Texas federal judge shot down Samsung's attempt to throw out a $303 million verdict over infringement of server memory patents, saying the South Korean electronics giant's arguments that Netlist's comments prejudiced it during trial fell short in a July 12 opinion that was unsealed Tuesday.

  • July 23, 2024

    NC's $500K Med Mal Damages Cap Faces Fight

    A patient who obtained a $7.5 million jury verdict in her case against a North Carolina doctor over the loss of her unborn baby is challenging the constitutionality of the Tar Heel State's cap on compensatory damages in medical negligence suits.

  • July 23, 2024

    Prosecutor Turned Witness: 'Rust' Case Shows Rare Dilemma

    The botched "Rust" trial of Alec Baldwin and Donald Trump's election interference case in Georgia have offered scarce examples of prosecutors taking the stand, demonstrating how ethics scandals can snowball and make government attorneys choose between protecting themselves or their cases.

  • July 23, 2024

    Sonos Tells Fed. Circ. 100K Patents At Risk If Google Prevails

    Wireless audio brand Sonos has warned the Federal Circuit that a federal judge's decision to scrap its jury win in a $32.5 million patent case against Google means that "about 100,000 patents are vulnerable."

  • July 23, 2024

    4th Circ. Says Bad Jury Instructions Gave J&J Win In Mesh Suit

    The Fourth Circuit has vacated a judgment in Ethicon Inc. and Johnson & Johnson's favor in a suit from a woman alleging Ethicon's pelvic mesh was defective, saying a federal judge was wrong to limit her expert's opinion based on the so-called elimination mandate.

  • July 23, 2024

    Bros. Want New Trial For Concrete Price-Fixing Convictions

    Two brothers convicted earlier this month of involvement in a ready-made concrete bid-rigging and price-fixing scheme asked a Georgia federal judge Monday for another shot at trial, arguing that repeated testimony about purported law-breaking tipped the scales in favor of federal prosecutors.

  • July 23, 2024

    Fiat Chrysler Escapes Damages, But Defect Finding Stands

    Fiat Chrysler doesn't owe anything to consumers who sued it over allegedly faulty automatic head restraints in its vehicles, a Florida federal judge ruled, affirming a Fort Lauderdale jury's determination, but he declined to give the automaker a total win because it did violate the state's unfair trade law.

  • July 23, 2024

    Bannon To Face Border Wall Trial After Release From Prison

    Steve Bannon's New York trial on charges that he stole donor money earmarked for a wall along the southern U.S. border will begin on Dec. 9, a month and a half after the former Donald Trump adviser is released from prison on a separate contempt of Congress conviction.

  • July 23, 2024

    No Victims, No Fraud, Trump Says In $465M Judgment Appeal

    Donald Trump has appealed the $465 million judgment against him, arguing that the New York attorney general exceeded her authority in her civil fraud suit against the former president because the statute in question does not apply to victimless transactions.

  • July 23, 2024

    GM Says $100M Fee Request In Engine Defect Suit Is Too Much

    General Motors LLC is urging a California federal court not to grant more than $100 million in fees and $1 million in costs to counsel for a class of car buyers who won a $100 million trial in 2022, saying many of the fees and costs can't be recovered under the law.

  • July 23, 2024

    Jerry Jones Strikes Midtrial Deal With Woman Claiming Paternity

    Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones agreed to fulfill his remaining financial obligations to a 27-year-old woman who claims to be his daughter under a settlement reached Tuesday during a Texas federal trial over his claims that she violated their agreement by suing him in state court.

  • July 23, 2024

    Sig Sauer Says $2.35M Verdict Result Of 'Passion & Prejudice'

    After a Georgia jury hit gunmaker Sig Sauer Inc. with a $2.35 million verdict last month over charges that a defect in its popular P320 pistol caused a man to accidentally shoot himself, the company filed a slew of motions Monday saying the judgment should be tossed or, at the least, cut down in size.

  • July 22, 2024

    'Bully' Jerry Jones Rips Alleged Daughter As Driven By Greed

    Counsel for Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones told a Texas federal jury Monday that a 27-year-old woman who claims Jones is her biological father was motivated to violate an agreement out of greed, while the defense painted Jones as a "bully" who wanted to keep his out-of-wedlock paternity a secret from his "real family."

  • July 22, 2024

    Fla. Jury Says Insurance Broker Owes $3M For Worker Poaching

    A Florida federal jury has awarded more than $3 million in damages to a New York insurance brokerage in a trial over employment contracts, finding that a competitor interfered with its business by helping two employees breach fiduciary duties when they switched jobs and brought client lists with them.

  • July 22, 2024

    Tevra Says Bayer Owes Millions As Antitrust Trial Opens

    Tevra Brands LLC told a California federal jury during antitrust trial openings Monday that Bayer owes millions of dollars for allegedly cutting anticompetitive deals with retailers to undermine competition from anti-flea-and-tick treatment generics, while Bayer defended its "reasonable" and optional retailer discounts and criticized Tevra's "astronomical" damages demand.

  • July 22, 2024

    Wells Fargo Flouted Director's Dignity, Jury Told In ADA Trial

    Wells Fargo chose to lay off a longtime managing director to avoid dealing with his request to continue working from home to cope with his bladder and colon condition as the bank readied for a return to office after the pandemic, a federal jury in Charlotte heard Monday.

  • July 22, 2024

    Ex-Lobbyist Asks To Be Severed From Madigan RICO Case

    The former Commonwealth Edison lobbyist on track to face a jury alongside former Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan this fall asked a federal judge Friday to sever his corruption case from Madigan's, saying a joint trial would be unfair because Madigan's lawyers intend to act as "second prosecutors" against him.

  • July 22, 2024

    Scanner Maker Tells 4th Circ. Contract Ends Honeywell Suit

    Laser technology company Opto Electronics urged the Fourth Circuit to overturn a jury finding that it was liable for ripping off Honeywell International over royalties for barcode scanners, arguing that a contract between the companies foreclosed the result as a matter of law.

  • July 22, 2024

    Wash. Jury Says Seattle Port Owes Fired Police Chief $24.2M

    A Washington state jury said Monday that the Port of Seattle owes its ex-police chief $24.2 million, capping off a six-week trial on his claims that the port axed him as punishment for complaining about lack of due process in workplace misconduct investigations.

  • July 22, 2024

    Judge Limits Girardi Clients' Injury Details In Upcoming Trial

    Jurors in former celebrity lawyer Tom Girardi's upcoming fraud trial will be spared detailed testimony about the severe injuries that drove his alleged victims to hire his law firm, a Los Angeles federal judge has ruled, saying the former clients' injuries are a key part of their stories, but graphic details are not necessary.

  • July 22, 2024

    Hunter Biden Drops Suit Against Fox News Over 'Mock Trial'

    Hunter Biden has dropped a Manhattan federal court lawsuit against Fox News over a six-part "mock trial" the cable network broadcasted that featured a fictional trial on two charges that Biden never actually faced.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Being A Luthier Makes Me a Better Lawyer

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    When I’m not working as an appellate lawyer, I spend my spare time building guitars — a craft known as luthiery — which has helped to enhance the discipline, patience and resilience needed to write better briefs, says Rob Carty at Nichols Brar.

  • Lead Like 'Ted Lasso' By Embracing Cognitive Diversity

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    The Apple TV+ series “Ted Lasso” aptly illustrates how embracing cognitive diversity can be a winning strategy for teams, providing a useful lesson for law firms, which can benefit significantly from fresh, diverse perspectives and collaborative problem-solving, says Paul Manuele at PR Manuele Consulting.

  • Justices' Criminal Law Decisions: The Term In Review

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    Each of the 11 criminal decisions issued in the U.S. Supreme Court’s recently concluded term is independently important, but taken together, they reveal trends in the court’s broader approach to criminal law, presenting both pitfalls and opportunities for defendants and their counsel, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Challenging Prosecutors' Use Of Defendants' Jail Phone Calls

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    Although it’s an uphill battle under current case law, counsel for pretrial detainees may be able to challenge prosecutors’ use of jail-recorded phone calls between the defendant and their attorney by taking certain advance measures, say Jim McLoughlin and Fielding Huseth at Moore & Van Allen.

  • A Simple Proposal For Improving E-Discovery In MDLs

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    Given the importance of e-discovery in multidistrict litigation, courts, parties and counsel shouldn't have to reinvent the wheel in each newly consolidated case — and a simple process for sharing e-discovery lessons and knowledge across MDLs could benefit everyone involved, particularly clients, say Benjamin Barnett and Shauna Itri at Seeger Weiss.

  • Opinion

    Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

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    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • Series

    Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • Big Business May Come To Rue The Post-Administrative State

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    Many have framed the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decisions overturning Chevron deference and extending the window to challenge regulations as big wins for big business, but sand in the gears of agency rulemaking may be a double-edged sword, creating prolonged uncertainty that impedes businesses’ ability to plan for the future, says Todd Baker at Columbia University.

  • Opinion

    Post-Chevron, Good Riddance To The Sentencing Guidelines

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s overturning of the Chevron doctrine may signal the end of the U.S. sentencing guidelines, which is good news given that they have accomplished the opposite of Congress’ original intent to bring certainty, proportionality and uniformity to sentencing, say attorneys Mark Allenbaugh, Doug Passon and Alan Ellis.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

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    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • How Attorneys Can Reduce Bad Behavior At Deposition

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    To minimize unprofessional behavior by opposing counsel and witnesses, and take charge of the room at deposition, attorneys should lay out some key ground rules at the outset — and be sure to model good behavior themselves, says John Farrell at Fish & Richardson.

  • Best Text Practices In Light Of Terraform's $4.5B Fraud Deal

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    Text messages were extremely important in a recent civil trial against Terraform Labs, leading to a $4.5 billion settlement, so litigants in securities fraud cases need to have robust mobile data policies that address the content and retention of messages, and the obligations of employees to allow for collection, say Josh Sohn and Alicia Clausen at Crowell & Moring.

  • Tricky Venue Issues Persist In Fortenberry Prosecution Redo

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    Former Rep. Jeff Fortenberry was recently indicted for a second time after the Ninth Circuit tossed his previous conviction for improper venue, but the case, now pending in the District of Columbia, continues to illustrate the complexities of proper venue in "false statement scheme" prosecutions, says Kevin Coleman at Covington.

  • Series

    Solving Puzzles Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Tackling daily puzzles — like Wordle, KenKen and Connections — has bolstered my intellectual property litigation practice by helping me to exercise different mental skills, acknowledge minor but important details, and build and reinforce good habits, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

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