Massachusetts

  • July 23, 2024

    Cannabis Industry Stakeholders Weigh In On Rescheduling

    As the period for public comment on the Biden administration's proposal to reclassify marijuana came to a close Monday, anti-legalization activists, marijuana industry advocates and state cannabis regulators each submitted their thoughts on the potential policy shift.

  • July 23, 2024

    Chancery Spikes Raytheon Stockholder's Derivative Suit

    A shareholder who faulted directors at Raytheon Technologies Corp. for allowing a special committee to change employee compensation plans without first seeking stockholder approval has failed to show how the board of directors did anything wrong, a Delaware vice chancellor ruled Tuesday, dismissing the derivative lawsuit.

  • July 23, 2024

    Mother Urges Sanctions On Nonprofit Over Unpaid $13.4M Win

    An 81-year old mother who won a $13.4 million judgment after her son died in a group home run by the Connecticut Institute for the Blind asked a state court judge Tuesday to order swift sanctions against the nonprofit for allegedly dodging depositions and stalling attempts to collect the award.

  • July 23, 2024

    Harvard Hit With Bias Suit By Coach Ousted Amid Complaints

    The former longtime women's hockey coach at Harvard University alleged in a federal suit Tuesday that school administrators held her to a different standard and paid her "significantly" less than male coaches, before pushing her out over what she says were ultimately unsubstantiated complaints from ex-players.

  • July 23, 2024

    'Surface Water' Stumps Mass. Justices In Loss For Insurers

    The top court in Massachusetts on Tuesday ruled in favor of a hospital seeking insurance coverage stemming from a severe rainstorm, saying it's unclear if water that pooled on the hospital's roof should be considered "surface water" that would trigger policy limits on flood damage.

  • July 23, 2024

    Mass. Pig Farming Law Survives Pork Industry Challenge

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Tuesday shot down a suit from out-of-state hog farmers and food producers challenging a state law that bans the sale of pork from pigs that are kept in tightly confined spaces, saying nothing in the law conflicts with federal statutes.

  • July 23, 2024

    Whole Foods Settles With Ex-Worker In BLM Mask Dispute

    Whole Foods Market has reached a tentative settlement with a former employee at its Cambridge, Massachusetts, store who says she was fired in 2020 in retaliation for wearing a Black Lives Matter mask, a month before the case was set to go to trial.

  • July 22, 2024

    State Street Sets Aside $4.2M To Address Wage Discrimination

    Federal financial services provider State Street agreed to set aside $4.2 million to make wage adjustments in the future as part of a settlement to resolve allegations that it discriminated against some women managing directors with its base pay and bonuses, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Monday.

  • July 22, 2024

    Allarity Warns Of SEC Suit Over Cancer Drug Statements

    Clinical stage pharmaceutical company Allarity Therapeutics informed investors Monday that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is preparing to sue following an investigation into statements the company made as it sought approval for a new cancer treatment.

  • July 22, 2024

    1st Circ. Hints At Higher Bar For Feds In Anti-Kickback Cases

    The First Circuit on Monday questioned the government's assertion that Congress intended to broaden the standard for liability in False Claims Act kickback cases when it passed a key amendment in 2010.

  • July 22, 2024

    Boston Fund Can't Duck SEC's Unregistered Dealer Case

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Monday kept alive U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission allegations that Boston investment firm Auctus Fund violated securities laws by failing to register as a broker-dealer when harvesting deeply discounted shares of cash-strapped public companies through debt agreements.

  • July 22, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A $6 million bank fee, a $42.5 million shopping mall deal, some questionable Amazon deliveries and long-ago expired ketchup: it was all part of the comings and goings in Delaware's Court of Chancery last week. New cases involved mining and cybersecurity companies, board takeovers, "weaponized" director election provisions, and legal fees following a $3.1 billion telecom merger. In case you missed it, here's the latest from the Chancery Court.

  • July 22, 2024

    1st Circ. Doubts Calif. Law Governs DraftKings Job Fight

    A former DraftKings executive seeking to undo his noncompete contract appeared to make little headway with the First Circuit on Monday as he argued that Massachusetts law should take a backseat in the dispute to California's more worker-friendly statute.

  • July 22, 2024

    Paul Hastings Lands New GC From Kirkland

    Paul Hastings LLP announced Monday that Kirkland & Ellis LLP's former deputy assistant general counsel has joined its roster and will serve as its general counsel.

  • July 19, 2024

    Mass. Court Says Med Mal Jury Selection Fair, OKs Doc's Win

    An intermediate-level appeals court in Massachusetts on Friday affirmed a defense verdict in a suit accusing a doctor of failing to properly treat a patient's undiagnosed diabetes, which purportedly caused her death days later, saying certain jury selection questions proposed by plaintiffs' counsel were properly revised by the trial judge.

  • July 19, 2024

    Berkshire Bank Says It's Not At Fault For $90M Ponzi Scheme

    Berkshire Bank asked a New York federal judge to toss a proposed class action seeking to hold it liable for providing financial services to a bankrupt local business person whom the investor accused of operating a $90 million Ponzi scheme, saying the investor does not show Berkshire did anything more than provide routine banking services.

  • July 19, 2024

    Boehringer Looks To Toss Inhaler Antitrust Case

    Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc. urged a Massachusetts federal court to toss a proposed class action accusing it of blocking generic versions of two inhaler medications, saying it has valid patents protecting the products.

  • July 19, 2024

    Hanover Tries To Delay $13.4M Award Over Home-Care Death

    Massachusetts-based Hanover Insurance Group says it should not be forced to pay a $13.4 million judgment awarded by a jury in March to the family of a man who died in a Connecticut group home until the home operator's appeal is decided, in a motion filed in New Haven Superior Court.

  • July 19, 2024

    Calif. Alice Invalidations Block Koss' PTAB Appeal At Fed. Circ.

    The Federal Circuit on Friday said it won't review whether the Patent Trial and Appeal Board rightfully invalidated some claims of Koss Corp.'s wireless earphone patents, as the patents were definitively invalidated in California.

  • July 19, 2024

    Shoemaker Asks Court To Trim Birkenstock Copycat Claim

    A judge said Friday that she couldn't tell the difference between several popular styles of Birkenstock sandals and alleged "knockoff" versions made by a New Hampshire company based on photos, signaling potential trouble for the defendant in a trademark infringement lawsuit by the German footwear-maker.

  • July 19, 2024

    Prince Lobel Fires Atty Following Misconduct Investigation

    A former general counsel for the Boston Cannabis Board turned chair of Prince Lobel Tye LLP's restaurant and hospitality group has been terminated by the Boston firm following an investigation, the firm confirmed to Law360 Pulse on Friday.

  • July 19, 2024

    1st Circ. Says Refugee's Evidence Of Persecution Was Ignored

    A refugee facing removal for firearm offenses has another chance at staying in the U.S., as the First Circuit found an immigration judge failed to consider whether his family was persecuted while escaping Liberia during a genocide.

  • July 19, 2024

    Jury Finds Gibson The Rightful Owner Of Liberace Piano

    A Boston federal jury on Friday affirmed Gibson Guitars' right to have Liberace's bedazzled 9-foot-long grand piano returned to it from a Massachusetts piano store to which it loaned the entertainer's iconic instrument more than a decade ago.

  • July 19, 2024

    Regeneron Rips DOJ's FCA Suit As 'Divorced From Reality'

    Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. has told a Massachusetts federal judge that a False Claims Act suit brought by the U.S. Department of Justice claiming the company withheld information about a drug's average sales price was "divorced from reality" and the practice the government was complaining about was commonplace.

  • July 18, 2024

    Auto Software Co. Cerence's Brass Sued Over Licensing Woes

    A shareholder of Cerence Inc. has sued the automobile software company's current and former top brass in Delaware Chancery Court, alleging they made misleading and false statements about the company's expected revenue and the types of licensing deals the company was pushing and entering into.

Expert Analysis

  • Lead Like 'Ted Lasso' By Embracing Cognitive Diversity

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    The Apple TV+ series “Ted Lasso” aptly illustrates how embracing cognitive diversity can be a winning strategy for teams, providing a useful lesson for law firms, which can benefit significantly from fresh, diverse perspectives and collaborative problem-solving, says Paul Manuele at PR Manuele Consulting.

  • New State Climate Liability Laws: What Companies Must Know

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    New legislation in Vermont and New York creating liability and compliance obligations for businesses deemed responsible for climate change — as well as similar bills proposed in California, Massachusetts and Maryland — have far-reaching implications for companies, so it is vital to remain vigilant as these initiatives progress, say Gregory Berlin and Jeffrey Dintzer at Alston & Bird.

  • Opinion

    Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

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    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • A Look At State AGs Supermarket Antitrust Enforcement Push

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    The ongoing antitrust intervention by state attorneys general in the proposed Kroger and Albertsons merger suggests that states are straying from a Federal Trade Commission follow-on strategy in the supermarket space, which involved joining federal investigations or lawsuits and settling for the same divestment remedies, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Series

    Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

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    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • 7th Circ Joins Trend Of No CGL Coverage For Structural Flaws

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    The Seventh Circuit, which recently held potential structural instability did not count as property damage under a construction company's commercial general liability policy, joins a growing consensus that faulty work does not implicate coverage without tangible and present damage to the project, say Sarah Abrams at Baleen Specialty, and Elan Kandel and James Talbert at Bailey Cavalieri.

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • Series

    Solving Puzzles Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Tackling daily puzzles — like Wordle, KenKen and Connections — has bolstered my intellectual property litigation practice by helping me to exercise different mental skills, acknowledge minor but important details, and build and reinforce good habits, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • Texas Ethics Opinion Flags Hazards Of Unauthorized Practice

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    The Texas Professional Ethics Committee's recently issued proposed opinion finding that in-house counsel providing legal services to the company's clients constitutes the unauthorized practice of law is a valuable clarification given that a UPL violation — a misdemeanor in most states — carries high stakes, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Why High Court Social Media Ruling Will Be Hotly Debated

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    In deciding the NetChoice cases that challenged Florida and Texas content moderation laws, what the U.S. Supreme Court justices said about social media platforms — and the First Amendment — will have implications and raise questions for nearly all online operators, say Jacob Canter and Joanna Rosen Forster at Crowell & Moring.

  • Realtor Settlement May Create New Antitrust Pitfalls

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    Following a recent antitrust settlement between the National Association of Realtors and home sellers, practices are set to change and the increased competition may benefit both brokers and homebuyers, but the loss of the customary method of buyer broker compensation could lead to new antitrust concerns, says Colin Ahler at Snell & Wilmer.

  • In Memoriam: The Modern Administrative State

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    On June 28, the modern administrative state, where courts deferred to agency interpretations of ambiguous statutes, died when the U.S. Supreme Court overruled its previous decision in Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council — but it is survived by many cases decided under the Chevron framework, say Joseph Schaeffer and Jessica Deyoe at Babst Calland.

  • How To Clean Up Your Generative AI-Produced Legal Drafts

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    As law firms increasingly rely on generative artificial intelligence tools to produce legal text, attorneys should be on guard for the overuse of cohesive devices in initial drafts, and consider a few editing pointers to clean up AI’s repetitive and choppy outputs, says Ivy Grey at WordRake.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Various Paths For Labor And Employment Law

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    Labor and employment law leans heavily on federal agency guidance, so the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to toss out Chevron deference will ripple through this area, with future workplace policies possibly taking shape through strategic litigation, informal guidance, state-level regulation and more, says Alexander MacDonald at Littler.

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