Benefits

  • July 23, 2024

    Families Seek Class Cert. In Premera Teen Trans Care Case

    The families of transgender teens are seeking class certification in a case accusing Premera Blue Cross of age and sex discrimination after denying coverage for gender-affirming chest surgery because the teens are under 18, according to a motion filed in Washington federal court.

  • July 23, 2024

    Cornell Tells High Court Not To Touch Workers' ERISA Suit

    Cornell University urged the U.S. Supreme Court not to take up a class action accusing it of mismanaging its employees' retirement savings, saying it shouldn't disturb a Second Circuit ruling that found the workers leading the suit failed to show that Cornell's payments to its service providers involved self-dealing.

  • July 23, 2024

    Chancery Spikes Raytheon Stockholder's Derivative Suit

    A shareholder who faulted directors at Raytheon Technologies Corp. for allowing a special committee to change employee compensation plans without first seeking stockholder approval has failed to show how the board of directors did anything wrong, a Delaware vice chancellor ruled Tuesday, dismissing the derivative lawsuit.

  • July 23, 2024

    Mother Urges Sanctions On Nonprofit Over Unpaid $13.4M Win

    An 81-year old mother who won a $13.4 million judgment after her son died in a group home run by the Connecticut Institute for the Blind asked a state court judge Tuesday to order swift sanctions against the nonprofit for allegedly dodging depositions and stalling attempts to collect the award.

  • July 23, 2024

    Labor Dept. ESG Rule May Survive Chevron's Demise

    The Fifth Circuit recently overturned a ruling that relied on the now-defunct doctrine of Chevron deference to uphold a U.S. Department of Labor rule covering socially conscious retirement plan investing, but some experts believe the rule has a good chance at surviving — even with the precedent off the books.

  • July 23, 2024

    Union, Workers Can't Halt Release Of Therapy Docs

    An AFL-CIO affiliated union can't stop a utility company from requesting therapy notes from three workers who are trying to return to work from short-term disability, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled, saying that there is a lack of irreparable injury.

  • July 23, 2024

    Feds Urge 6th Circ. To Affirm Pharma Owner's Fraud Sentence

    The Sixth Circuit should affirm a district court's fraud convictions, nearly five-year sentence and $7 million restitution order against an Ohio pharmaceutical salesman who underreported his income to reduce his tax liability in a multimillion-dollar scheme involving bogus insurance billings, the federal government said.

  • July 23, 2024

    Funds Say Boeing Can't Ditch 737 Max Securities Suit

    Pension funds leading a proposed securities fraud suit against Boeing have fired back at the airline manufacturer's attempt to dismiss allegations that it misled investors about the safety of its 737 Max jets, saying the suit sufficiently showcases how missteps by Boeing's top brass diminished shareholder value.

  • July 23, 2024

    Malpractice Insurer Escapes Conn. Firm's Suit For Coverage

    A Connecticut law firm and its principal will not have their legal bills reimbursed by their malpractice insurer after a state judge granted an early win to the insurance company, noting the firm admitted it was already facing a misconduct claim when its policy went into effect.

  • July 23, 2024

    Senate Dems Roll Out Bill To Codify Chevron Deference

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., led a group of Democratic senators Tuesday in introducing a bill to codify the now-defunct doctrine of Chevron deference after it was struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court last month.

  • July 23, 2024

    Schnader Harrison Must Face Ex-Firm Atty's Class Action

    The former equity partners of defunct law firm Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP must face a proposed class action accusing them of improperly spending employee money intended for the firm's retirement plan, after a Pennsylvania federal judge shot down their motion to dismiss.

  • July 23, 2024

    Chamber Rips Multibillion-Dollar Atty Fee Bid In Musk Pay Suit

    The nation's largest business organization has urged Delaware's Court of Chancery to adopt sweeping curbs to jumbo plaintiff attorney fee awards, declaring a multibillion-dollar fee bid following the cancellation of Tesla CEO Elon Musk's stock-based pay plan "shocks the conscience."

  • July 22, 2024

    Investment Adviser Seeks To Ax Union Fund's Bad Advice Suit

    A union pension fund that claims it lost $30 million due to bad investment advice it received in the mid-2010s missed its chance to challenge that advice, an investment advisory firm argued in California federal court, saying the fund blew past its deadline to sue and didn't qualify for an extension.

  • July 22, 2024

    Plantronics Investors Ink $29.5M 'Channel Stuffing' Sales Deal

    Plantronics investors have asked a California federal judge to greenlight a $29.5 million settlement resolving their claims the company used unsustainable "channel stuffing" sales practices to deceptively boost revenues, which led to a drop in stock price when the tactic failed and was revealed to investors.

  • July 22, 2024

    Uber, Investors Ink $200M Deal To End 'Train Wreck' IPO Suit

    Uber Technologies Inc. has agreed to pay $200 million to exit a class action accusing it of failing to inform investors about significant business risks tied to stalling growth and potential legal issues ahead of its $8.1 billion initial public offering in 2019.

  • July 22, 2024

    Ex-NFL Player Urges High Court To Hear Benefits Dispute

    A former NFL player urged the U.S. Supreme Court to take up his lawsuit accusing the league's retirement plan of shorting him on disability benefits payments for years, saying there's a circuit court split regarding the level of deference to apply when reviewing plan administrators' decisions.

  • July 22, 2024

    Anthem Blue Cross Wants Lab's $3.8M Suit Tossed

    Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield of Connecticut has asked a federal judge to toss a medical lab's lawsuit seeking nearly $3.8 million from it for refusing to pay for or underpaying for lab work and COVID-19 tests, arguing the claims are "baseless."

  • July 22, 2024

    Ex-NJ Judge Wants Chief Justice Deposed In Pension Suit

    A former Bergen County Superior Court judge told a New Jersey state court that she must be allowed to depose Chief Justice Stuart Rabner of the New Jersey Supreme Court because he has information about the state's decision to deny her disability benefits application that no one else has.

  • July 22, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A $6 million bank fee, a $42.5 million shopping mall deal, some questionable Amazon deliveries and long-ago expired ketchup: it was all part of the comings and goings in Delaware's Court of Chancery last week. New cases involved mining and cybersecurity companies, board takeovers, "weaponized" director election provisions, and legal fees following a $3.1 billion telecom merger. In case you missed it, here's the latest from the Chancery Court.

  • July 22, 2024

    Exec Comp Atty Returns To Wilson Sonsini As Practice Leader

    A San Francisco-based attorney from Freshfields, known for his work on some of the highest-profile deals of the past several years, is returning to Wilson Sonsini to co-lead its employee benefits and compensation practice, the firm announced Monday.

  • July 19, 2024

    Santos Can't Duck Charges Ahead Of Trial, Judge Says

    A New York federal judge on Friday refused to throw out identity theft and theft of public money charges against former U.S. Rep. George Santos, rejecting his arguments that the charges were too vague to survive.

  • July 19, 2024

    Investors Want Merrill, UBS Back In $364M Libor-Rigging Suit

    Investors who were allegedly harmed by the manipulation of a widely used interbank lending interest rate have appealed a final judgment that ended claims against major banks and financial services companies in protracted litigation that has garnered settlements totaling $364.5 million.

  • July 19, 2024

    Chancery Dismisses Kraft Heinz-3G Stock Drop Suit

    Shareholders of The Kraft Heinz Co. lost their Chancery Court lawsuit over a $1.2 billion stock sale by 3G Capital Inc. after the Delaware court deemed concerns about board conflicts "meaningless, given the dearth of well-pleaded allegations."

  • July 19, 2024

    3 Atty Takeaways On How AI Affects Employee Benefits

    Artificial intelligence technology has the potential to improve employee benefits administration and could even help employers and retirement savers avoid underperforming 401(k) investments, attorneys say. Here are three takeaways on how AI is affecting employee benefits administration and litigation.

  • July 19, 2024

    Hanover Tries To Delay $13.4M Award Over Home-Care Death

    Massachusetts-based Hanover Insurance Group says it should not be forced to pay a $13.4 million judgment awarded by a jury in March to the family of a man who died in a Connecticut group home until the home operator's appeal is decided, in a motion filed in New Haven Superior Court.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Being A Luthier Makes Me a Better Lawyer

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    When I’m not working as an appellate lawyer, I spend my spare time building guitars — a craft known as luthiery — which has helped to enhance the discipline, patience and resilience needed to write better briefs, says Rob Carty at Nichols Brar.

  • Lead Like 'Ted Lasso' By Embracing Cognitive Diversity

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    The Apple TV+ series “Ted Lasso” aptly illustrates how embracing cognitive diversity can be a winning strategy for teams, providing a useful lesson for law firms, which can benefit significantly from fresh, diverse perspectives and collaborative problem-solving, says Paul Manuele at PR Manuele Consulting.

  • American Airlines ESG Ruling Could Alter ERISA Landscape

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    The Spence v. American Airlines ESG trial, speeding toward a conclusion in a Texas federal court, could foretell a dramatic expansion in ERISA liability, with plan sponsors vulnerable to claims that they didn't foresee short-term dips in stock prices, say attorneys at Mayer Brown.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: July Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy considers cases touching on pre- and post-conviction detainment conditions, communications with class representatives, when the American Pipe tolling doctrine stops applying to modified classes, and more.

  • How To Comply With Chicago's New Paid Leave Ordinance

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    Chicago's new Paid Leave and Paid Sick and Safe Leave Ordinance went into effect earlier this month, so employers subject to the new rules should update leave policies, train supervisors and deliver notice as they seek compliance, say Alison Crane and Sarah Gasperini at Jackson Lewis.

  • Dueling Calif. Rulings Offer Insight On 401(k) Forfeiture Suits

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    Two recent decisions from California federal courts regarding novel Employee Retirement Income Security Act claims around 401(k) forfeitures provide early tea leaves for companies that may face similar litigation, offering reasons for both optimism and concern over the future direction of the law, say Ashley Johnson and Jennafer Tryck at Gibson Dunn.

  • Loss Causation Ruling Departs From Usual Securities Cases

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    A California federal court recently dismissed Ramos v. Comerica, finding that the allegations failed to establish loss causation, but the reasoning is in tension with the pleading-stage approaches generally followed by both courts and economists in securities fraud litigation, say Jesse Jensen and Aasiya Glover at Bernstein Litowitz.

  • Opinion

    Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

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    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • Series

    Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

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    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • Accidental Death Ruling Shows ERISA Review Standard's Pull

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    The Eleventh Circuit’s recent accidental death insurance ruling in Goldfarb v. Reliance Standard Life Insurance illustrates how an arbitrary and capricious standard of review in Employee Retirement Income Security Act denial-of-benefits cases creates a steep uphill battle for benefit claimants, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • 50 Years Later, ERISA Remains A Work In Progress

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    A look at the 50 years since the Employee Retirement Income Security Act’s passage shows that while the law safeguards benefits through vesting rules, fiduciary responsibilities and anti-discrimination provisions, the act falls short in three key areas, says Carol Buckmann at Cohen & Buckmann.

  • Series

    Solving Puzzles Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Tackling daily puzzles — like Wordle, KenKen and Connections — has bolstered my intellectual property litigation practice by helping me to exercise different mental skills, acknowledge minor but important details, and build and reinforce good habits, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • 1st Gender Care Ban Provides Context For High Court Case

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    The history of Arkansas' ban on gender-affirming medical care — the first such legislation in the U.S. — provides important insight into the far-reaching ramifications that the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in U.S. v. Skrmetti next term will have on transgender healthcare, says Tyler Saenz at Baker Donelson.

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